Will My Medicare Plan Cover My Spouse?

Medicare is defined as an individual plan for those over the age of 65 and paid Social Security taxes for approximately ten years, or 40 quarters of work. If your spouse did not work, therefore not meeting these requirements, the only part of Medicare they may qualify for is Medicare Part A, depending on your work history when you reach the age of 65.

Medicare Eligibility Rules For Spouses

To qualify for Medicare Part A at the age of 65, based on your spouse’s work history, you must meet three requirements:

  • You and your spouse, who qualifies for Social Security benefits at the age of 65, have been married for at least one year before applying for Social Security benefits
  • You are divorced, but were married to a spouse for at least 10 years who qualifies for Social Security benefits. You must be single at the time you apply for Social Security benefits
  • You are widowed, but were married for at least nine months before your spouse passed away, and they qualified for Social Security benefits. You must also still be single at the time of application.

If you are unsure about qualifications or have questions about Social Security benefits, call Turning 65 Solutions and speak with a Medicare expert today!

Can I Share Parts Of My Medicare Plan With My Spouse?

The only part of Medicare that your spouse qualifies for is Medicare Part A. This coverage for your spouse includes:

  • inpatient hospital care
  • inpatient mental health services
  • inpatient rehabilitation services
  • hospice services
  • limited home care
  • limited stays in SNFs, or skilled nursing facilities 

While you can determine their eligibility for this part of Medicare, you cannot technically “share” coverage with your spouse. Medicare plans are individual plans, so you and your spouse must have your own individual Medicare plan. There is no couple’s coverage under Medicare insurance.

My Non-Working Spouse Is Older Than Me, But I Meet The 40 Quarters Requirement

If your spouse did not work, therefore not meeting the 40 quarters requirement, then they must wait until they turn 65 and you turn 62 to receive benefits. In this instance, they typically can receive premium-free Medicare benefits. If your spouse is 65, they can qualify for Medicare Part A but will be required to pay the Part A premium until you reach the age of 62.

To learn more about the coverage options with Medicare and how you or your spouse may qualify, reach out to Turning 65 Solutions today!

Turning 65 Solutions can help you plan for the future.